Undertaken in the midst of a push to expand Canada’s oilsands production, the Northern Gateway pipeline project has attracted a groundswell of commentary and controversy. Line In The Sand is a multimedia project which invites candid and critical analysis from those who live along the pipeline’s proposed route, where it’s impacts would be most directly felt. A sampling of interviews conducted to date can be found below.

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The latest from the Line in the Sand team

End of the line – Masset, Haida Gwaii

The ocean is, and has always been, a vital part to Haida culture; it’s a gathering place, a playground, a teacher, and a grocery store all bundled into one. Masset has a very different feel to either Skidegate or Queen Charlotte City – less populated, certainly, but also less hurried and more humble.

High seas – Skidegate, Haida Gwaii

Today, Haida culture is once again flourishing, thanks in large part to the Haida Language Center, dedicated to preserving the Haida language through the creation of immersion programs and educational curriculum. It is here that we’ve settled in for the morning, to hear Elders’ thoughts on Enbridge’s plan to send upwards of 225 super-tankers per year through their waters.

Portside – Prince Rupert, BC

Roughly a hundred years ago, the area surrounding Prince Rupert was known for its canneries. Today, the wooden structures that once housed thousands of workers are for the most part abandoned or otherwise dilapidated, and serve as silent reminders of the cruel impermanence of resource-based industries.